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  • Anonymous
      Post count: 93172

      I’m sure no one meant to hurt your feelings – the idea is this:

      Graves is a serious disease. Do you want to live? Do you want to retain your sanity? Many people get put on disability because of this disease, Graves makes them unable to work. Life is not always fair, you may be forced to look for a different career IF and I stress “if” you have a problem with weight from treating your life-threatening disease.

      If this was cancer, would you neglect treatment just because chemotherapy could make you bloated and ugly? Or would you chose to live? This may not be a “big name” disease, but it’s real and if you want your health, please get treatment.

      If you don’t take care of your body, you simply won’t have a body with which to earn money. No platitudes are going to change this. Do you realize that a century ago most people just died from this, a horrible death, no less. Do you know that if untreated it can be misdiagnosed as schizophrenia? Do you want this to happen to your brain?

      Anonymous
        Post count: 93172

        Katylyn, I’m so sorry my remark about plus size modeling was distressing to you. Finding humor helps me deal with MY fears, but I know that doesn’t work for everyone. Obviously this is a serious issue for you and causing you pain, and I don’t wish to make light of THAT.

        As many have told you, there’s every hope that you can manage your weight through the treatment if you are determined to, and you’ll probably find your overall appearance improves as well.

        It looks to me like you want to go on modeling and let hyperthyroidism help you stay slim, without other consequences you can’t deal with. As people are telling you, that choice is a fantasy. The REAL choices you have may not include what you WANT (they haven’t for any of us), but they are the choices you have.

        Any aspect of our lives that depends on weight or beauty is only hanging by a thread anyway. Luckily, there’s more to us than THAT, and much more to beauty than weight and physical features. Not true for your life as a model–I know, but you will face this eventually, with or without Graves’.

        You might want to consult a nutritionist, and talk to your doctor about the best way to avoid hypothyroidism–and you always have the love and support of many here on the BB in your personal war against Graves’.

        Best Wishes,
        Dianne

        Anonymous
          Post count: 93172

          I can relate to you In a different way…I was a Special Forces commander for over five years. I had just recently transfered to my base of choice and was finally going to be a civilian trainer at the FBI academy at Quantico, Virginia. I was going to be making a good living. Then GD hit. It has ruined that dream. I can’t go back in time. In essence you still have a chance to continue your occupation, but you MAY end up hurting yourself more by not seeking treatment…there are numerous physical and mental problems that you could incure from your disease if it is not treated. (I don’t want to scare you- your doctor has probably told you this already)
          What I would recommend is to talk to your doctor and ask him what he thinks about what I did. I took meds, but I took them in small doses to start out with, smaller than what my doctor thought would make me euthyroid. I took the first dosage about 3 months and had blood tests about every three weeks. when the levels stabilized over about two or three tests, then my doctor upped the dosage a little and we did it again. I did not want to go hypo either, and this was the best way my doctor knew to keep that from happening other than not taking treatment at all. I am now resting at a high euthyroid state in the spectrum, far from hypo, and I hope to go into remission soon.

          Good luck,

          Ron

          Anonymous
            Post count: 93172

            Jake tells me that there are a number of other ‘posts’ about the 30 pound swing in weight that I am currently wrestling with waiting for my thyroid levels to become “normal”. I was hyper and after 2 RAI treatments am now waiting to go hypo before starting snythroid or something similar for medication. In the meantime I am heavier than I have ever been in my adult life, even during pregnancy, I think.
            Is there light at the end of the tunnel? Can you eventually lose this extra roll of blubber after thyroid levels become normal? Anyone else’s experience would sure help me here.
            Any articles I can be referred to?
            Thanks, anyone, for some insight into this topic.

            Anonymous
              Post count: 93172

              I’ve been reading lots of articles on this topic, wherever I can find them. The more reputable places — like Harvard Women’s Health Watch, the Mayo Clinics newsletter, etc. — all take the stance that we have to avoid fad type diets that eliminate balance from the diet; that we have to limit calories, but not to starvation levels; and that we have to exercise like mad to beef up metabolism. Now, they are not talking about Graves’ patients in particular. Women, in general, often see a weight gain in the middle age years, apparently due to the lowering of estrogen? I don’t know. Anyway, the latest article I read gave the amount of exercise and I groaned. I could do it. We all could. But budgeting time to walk at least 12 miles a week means I have to severely revamp my schedule. And get off my couch. ; )

              Bobbi

              Anonymous
                Post count: 93172

                i struggled for years with weight gain. i went from 110 lbs. all the way up to 202. i did every thing i could from starving to going crazy. i finally tried that ” dr. Atkins diet”. i thought i would gain weight doing what they said to do, but i lost 17 lbs. the first 2 weeks. i’m down 26 lbs now, and still losing. it might be worth a try.

                Anonymous
                  Post count: 93172

                  If you are doing the Adkins diet, I recommend that you do so with your doctors advice and supervision. Several people I know had some side effects that ranged from mild to severe from the diet as it tends to not be too terribly balanced, so medical supervision is a very good idea. If your doctor isn’t very good with nutrition and such, see if he/she can recommend you to a dietian/nutritionist for guidance.

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