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  • Anonymous
      Post count: 93172

      Jan, thanks so much for taking the time to answer.Have all Jake’s 12 eye surgeries been for double vision? If so, why haven’t they helped his condition? This is my first time on a bulletin board – so the process of contacting Jake @ support-group.com seems monumental especially since I’m so tired etc. Thanks again.

      Anonymous
        Post count: 93172

        Hi, Adam:

        Many of us have had, or do have, double vision. It is, as you may know, caused by a thickening of enflamed eye muscles, caused by the Graves antibody attack. The muscles of the two eyes no longer can coordinate, as a result, to provide a single image to the brain.

        It depends upon what stage of the double vision you are in, as to what you can do to cope with it or correct it. As Jan mentioned, there is a surgery (called strabismus surgery) which attempts to fix it. To get the surgery, though, your eyes have to have stabilized — it makes little point in going into surgery with eyes that are changing weekly/monthly due to an ongoing “hot” phase of the disease. If you are still in the hot phase, one of the remedies is to patch one eye (and rotate the patches, so that you do not inadvertantly weaken one eye over the other). There are eye patches available at drug stores, typically, that are very inexpensive. Some folks accomplish the same thing by putting tape over one of the lens on their glasses (this makes it harder to rotate the patches though). Blocking the sight in one eye brings back a single image. If your eyes are stable, and the double vision constant (as opposed to intermittent — the stage I’m in), there are prisms that can be added to glasses, both temporary and permanent variety, which can counteract the problem of the muscles not working together to provide a single image.

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