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  • Anonymous
      Post count: 93172

      Hello. I have been suffering with TED for quite some time and have had many surgeries to try and correct the problem. My last surgery was on Oct 11 and I am hoping that will be the last.
      However, after several weeks my eyes are still swollen from the surgery. And, my eyes are still draining, especially in the morning. Is this normal? I am so afraid that my eyes have become active again.
      Thank you for any advice.

      Anonymous
        Post count: 93172

        Millie,

        What kind of surgery did you have on October 11, and can you tell me more about the draining you are experiencing?

        First, I have to tell you that you need to be talking to your doctor about this in case you are having a complication that needs attention. I really don’t want you to be neglecting something that needs your doctor’s care. So please, get an appointment right away.

        That said, I’ve had a number of surgeries that have left me with sticky, eyes-stuck-shut-in-the morning type unpleasantness that lasts for six months or more, and the hard palate graft surgeries and orbital implant surgeries where there is a lot of invasiveness into the inner lining of the lower eyelid seem to result in that. If this is what you’re experiencing, I’m not saying you don’t need to see your doctor—please do that still!

        I hope this subject is not too much for those of you who haven’t been there. ;-)

        Dianne W
        Online Facilitator

        Anonymous
          Post count: 93172

          Thank you so much for your response. My surgery did involve change in my lower lid, maybe causing my eyes to be a little crusty in morning. I have been in contact with my eye doctor. He is not local, so I cannot see him as much as I would like.
          Again, thank you for your reply…it was a big help for me.
          Millie

          Anonymous
            Post count: 93172

            Hello All!
            I am happy to report that I have been feeling much better the last month or so and my levels have been stable. However, I have been having trouble with my eyes more lately and wanted to know what you all think. First of all my endo did not diagnose me with the Graves eye disease because I have no symptoms. However, after reading some posts here I’m beginning to wonder if what I am experiencing is due to Graves. My eyes are often watery and it looks like I’m crying but I’m not. It is especially bad if I am outside in the wind, sun, etc. My eyes have been this way for a long time, long before I was diagnosed with Graves, but it has been worse lately. Is this due to Graves? Also, what can I do to relieve the symptoms? Thanks!
            Angie

            Anonymous
              Post count: 93172

              Hi, Angie:

              Just for the record, our endocrinologists often do not diagnose thyroid eye disease. Sometimes they do, but it isn’t a guarantee. If you want to get the best information about the condition of your eyes you need to see an opthamologist. And opthamologists are the doctors that treat the eye disease, not endos. The diseases are separate and run separate courses, and need to be treated by different doctors. (That said, the opthamologists usually take a “wait and see” approach to things – there is no early treatment for the eye disease, at this point.) But the important thing to know is that treating the thyroid part of the disease does NOTHING to prevent or treat the eye disease.

              What you have described, however, is very common with those of us with Graves and is not necessarily a symptom of the eye disease. Thyroid disease changes the quality of our tears. (What follows is “amateur-speak” to describe what is going on.) Normal tears are thicker, and oilier. They tend to sit on the eyeball, lubricating constantly. With thyroid disease, our tears lose that thick, oiliness and get watery. They tend to “run” more easily, and they do not sit on the eyeball, lubricating constantly. And our eyes get dry. Often they get very dry. This is dangerous, because it means the cornea can get damaged (scratched, typically) and scratches on dry eyes do not heal well.

              What we need to do is use an over-the-counter product called “artificial tears”, and use it all the time. It comes in many different brands, and people develop a preference for one brand over another. My “instructions” from my doctor were to buy the individually packaged doses that come without preservatives. Some drops come advertising that they are “preservative free in the eye” — which sounds to me like market mumbo jumbo: they either have preservatives (i.e. come in multi-dose bottles) or they do not. You can check with your own doctor about whether you would need preservative-free drops or not. The main thing, however, is that you get a product that is called “artificial tears,” not a product that “gets the red out.” These products are in any drug store, and typically I can find them (although not necessarily the brand I prefer) in grocery stores, too. The drops also come in different thicknesses: tears for daytime and “goop” for night time. The night time product has the thickness of petroleum jelly, and it is designed to stay through night hours. If you are waking up with very dry eyes, you should probably, then, buy the night product, too.

              Bobbi — NGDF Online Facilitator

              Anonymous
                Post count: 93172

                Angie-

                I experience much of the same symptoms that you are describing, and I agree with Bobbi on her recommendations. I use eye drops to lubricate my eyes and it does help.

                I have also found that the more severe my “hyperthyroid” the more headaches that I get behind my eyes in addition to the dry eye. It is a personal “indicator” to me that my levels are getting worse or better. When I am really out of balance I get terrible headaches (that concentrate behind my eyes). The eye drops do not really help that. However, when the hyperthyroid is under control—the headaches abate and all I am left with is Dry Eye. That is combated by what Bobbi was describing. The more that you are outside in the sunshine/wind; the worse the dry eye will be. Try to get ahead of the dry eye, and then it is easier to control (at least it is for me). I have more problem with it in the warmer months (although Nebraska is known for its wind and dry weather which exacerbates the problem). Good sunglasses can help as well.

                I’m just speaking from personal experience here, so it may not be exactly the same for you. But, hopefully this helps.

                Good luck
                Anne

                Anonymous
                  Post count: 93172

                  Thanks for the responses and advice. I love knowing I have a place I can ask questions and get real answers! Thanks for the support!
                  Angie

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