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  • Anonymous
      Post count: 93172

      Hello everyone, I’m posting here today to say that if you don’t feel well, make sure you seek help from your doctor. I have been feeling really poorly these past couple of weeks and thought 1) It’s all in my head 2) I’ve been sick so long that I can’t tell a good day from a bad or 3) It’s happening to me because of all the medicines I’m on. I knew something was wrong and didn’t do anything about it and now I am hurting more. Since my body has been abinormal I just assumed it was me. I got a phone call today from my new Endo stating that my TSH level is at 75. The range they use is from 1.10 to 4.5 So I think 75 is a bit high. So please, all of us need to listen to our bodies. Thank you for listening to me. Diane

      Anonymous
        Post count: 93172

        I was reading my post when I noticed the range for TSH. Sorry it is incorrect. It should say the range is 0,10 to 4.5

        Anonymous
          Post count: 93172

          This is GREAT advise! As I have told others here through emails, I am considering switching endo doctors because my appointment was made in Nov. and I don’t get to see him for the initial consultation unil May. I have called him office repeatedly and cannot get him or his nurse. I was told by the receptionist that he is booked solid and that’s why I cannot get any response from him or an earlier appointment. My concern is that after I have the RIA and if I have problems, I may not be able to get ahold of him or get an appointment for 6-8 months. By then, I could be dying. Any thoughts??? Should I switch, or is this typical for endo docs to be too busy to help? I need help now and cannot get any without going to someone else. I’ve been seeing my internal med doc and she has been adjusting my meds a little but not enough. She wants to wait to see what the endo doc wants to do! Meanwhile, I am suffering! HELP, NEED ADVICE!

          Anonymous
            Post count: 93172

            An endo is an internal medicine doc who has specialized in the endocrine system. There are quite a few of us who do not live in the urban environment where we can shop around for endos. And some people do make do with internists. So, your doctor probably knows what she is doing in a basic sense.

            And, yes, endos tend to be busy. They are not necessarily busy all the time with thyroid issues — they do a lot of work with diabetes, and as you probably know, there is an increasing number of people with that disease.

            As to whether or not once you SEE this doctor, whether he/she would be available on a more reasonable basis as you go through treatment: some thoughts to help reason through things.

            1) How did you come to hear about this endo in the first place? Was he/she recommended by someone you respect adn trust? If the endo came highly recommended, that might help explain why he/she is so busy.

            2) In fairness to the doctor in question, you are judging him/her based on the performance of the office staff. And office staff can be guard dogs. They very often “protect” the doctor. Especially if the doctor in question is in high demand. Many of us have had to do battle with the “schedulers” in an endo’s office. What truly matters is the quality of care you get from the doctor. There are ways (eventually) to badger/butter up office staff a bit. Of course, at this point in time, you haven’t met the doctor, so “who knows?”

            3) Are you assuming that you would not have to wait for another endo? Have you called around? (Assuming that you have more than one to choose from.)

            Bobbi — NGDF Online Facilitator

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