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  • mollypop43
      Post count: 7

      Hey there! I was diagnosed with Graves when I was 18, so that was about 3 years ago. I have struggled with normalizing my levels since day one.
      Background info:
      – height 5′ 8″ and weight right before i was diagnosed was about 165 with descent amount of muscle (was definitely thicker though)
      – was fairly active, played competitive softball since i was 8 years old.
      – was a good student, took honors classes freshmen and sophomore year in highschool
      – taking Methimazole 10mg 3x a day and Atenelol 50mg 2x a day

      For the last couple years my endo and i have struggled a bit with getting my levels to calm down. I first had went in to the doctor because my parents were worried because i had a tremor, and had lost 28 pounds in a month. My brother was also diagnosed with graves just one year before me, around the same time. He had the same symptoms as me, every symptom you find on graves is what we had.

      So the last 6 months I have been experiencing extreme fatigue, muscle loss, even more weight loss, muscle/joint pain mostly in my neck, shoulders, lower back, and hips (radiates down my thighs). I am only 21 years old, I feel like im 60! :( before i had told myself “youre just lazy. You need to push yourself more, and find more drive” but i am a hairstylist, which obviously means im on my feet all day long (some days without a lunch break, or any break for that matter) and I feel like i am going to die by the end of the day!! I know it sounds dramatic, but I really dont know why this all happens. Super frustrating. Even on the weekends, all I want to do is lay in my bed all day long, or sleep alllll day. No matter how much sleep I get, my body is never fully satisfied. I have the worst time waking up in the morning as well, i have to set 3 different alarm clocks to make sure I wake up for work.

      On top of that, right around the time I started beauty school, i started to realize how dumb i had been starting to feel. I had the HARDEST time focusing on anything; schoolwork, listening to instructors lectures, or even a conversation face to face with my best friend. When I started my job at the salon last summer, they wanted me to learn the front desk before i started my apprentice program, It was the most frustrating thing in the world… I cant multitask worth a bean. My memory is shot, half the time I cant even remember what someone had told me 10 minutes earlier..Im constantly forgetting appointments, bills to pay, places to go, what my mom just asked me to pick up from the grocery store even though i just got off the phone with her 5 minutes ago. I feel so dumb, it honestly lowers my self esteem so much because its so hard for me to intake information, therefore i feel so dumb when it comes to learning anything. Again, I know it sounds dramatic, but these are all true things that i deal with on a day to day basis, and if it didnt effect my work/day to day life I would never speak a word of it.

      I now weigh 123 pounds, but it doesnt look good, my muscle is completely gone and I feel weak all the time. I cant even do a mens cut (which is just holding a pair of scissors slightly above my head) with out my arms burning like crazy. My spine sticks out of my back, my shoulders are super boney, and my collar bone is so defined that it looks pretty unattractive. I get comments on how frail i look quite a bit, my family just told me the other night i look “malnourished”

      I know the simple solution would be “you need to work out, and get some muscle back on you” but trust me, i have tried.. I cant even do the bike machine thing where youre sitting down and pedaling (which used to be the easiest when i worked out) on level 1 for 15 minutes!! My legs burn so bad, and get sooo weak. I feel like such a cry- baby, but i used to be very athletic, so i know that internal laziness is not the case.

      If anyone has any suggestions, that would be awesome. Thanks for listening to all of my complaining, i feel like no body understands so i figured i would see if anyone else had similar problems. :) thanks guys!

      ps. I am trying to avoid doing RAI :)

      Kimberly
      Online Facilitator
        Post count: 4291

        Hello – First of all, you are *not* being a baby…these are real symptoms brought on by Graves’ that are affecting your quality of life! We are fellow patients here, not docs, but here is some “food for thought” that will hopefully be of assistance…

        It’s helpful to get hard copies of your lab results so you can see for yourself where your levels are compared to the “normal” range. It’s also important for your doctor to base dosing decisions on Free T4 and T3 and *not* on TSH, which can remain suppressed for quite some time in Graves’ patients. Relying on TSH alone can set up a hyper/hypo rollercoaster effect.

        You are definitely *not* lazy. When I first got diagnosed with Graves’, it was all I could do to make it through the workday…and I spent most of my day sitting in front of a computer, not on my feet! Once you get your levels to where they are normal and stable, you can talk to your doc about an activity plan to *slowly* work on getting your stamina and muscle strength back.

        Memory issues are common in Graves’ patients. Most of us develop “memory tricks” here and there that help us get through our daily routines, such as writing things down in a daytimer, using alarm bells on a watch or cell phone, etc.. We shared a few ideas in this thread; definitely feel free to add any additional suggestions!

        http://gdatf.org/forum/topic/43193/

        All three treatment options (anti-thyroid drugs, surgery, RAI) have risks and benefits…but if you just aren’t feeling well after all this time, you might talk to your doctor about surgery as an option, since you said you did not want to do RAI. The “Treatment Options” thread in the announcements section of the forum has a couple of nice links that go through the pros and cons of all the options.

        Take care…and please check back to let us know how you are doing!

        mslux
          Post count: 33
          mollypop43 wrote:
          So the last 6 months I have been experiencing extreme fatigue, muscle loss, even more weight loss, muscle/joint pain mostly in my neck, shoulders, lower back, and hips (radiates down my thighs). I am only 21 years old, I feel like im 60! :( before i had told myself “youre just lazy. You need to push yourself more, and find more drive” but i am a hairstylist, which obviously means im on my feet all day long (some days without a lunch break, or any break for that matter) and I feel like i am going to die by the end of the day!! I know it sounds dramatic, but I really dont know why this all happens. Super frustrating. Even on the weekends, all I want to do is lay in my bed all day long, or sleep alllll day. No matter how much sleep I get, my body is never fully satisfied. I have the worst time waking up in the morning as well, i have to set 3 different alarm clocks to make sure I wake up for work.

          On top of that, right around the time I started beauty school, i started to realize how dumb i had been starting to feel. I had the HARDEST time focusing on anything; schoolwork, listening to instructors lectures, or even a conversation face to face with my best friend. When I started my job at the salon last summer, they wanted me to learn the front desk before i started my apprentice program, It was the most frustrating thing in the world… I cant multitask worth a bean. My memory is shot, half the time I cant even remember what someone had told me 10 minutes earlier..Im constantly forgetting appointments, bills to pay, places to go, what my mom just asked me to pick up from the grocery store even though i just got off the phone with her 5 minutes ago. I feel so dumb, it honestly lowers my self esteem so much because its so hard for me to intake information, therefore i feel so dumb when it comes to learning anything. Again, I know it sounds dramatic, but these are all true things that i deal with on a day to day basis, and if it didnt effect my work/day to day life I would never speak a word of it.

          Hi Mollypop,

          Your extreme fatigue and cognitive issues are very familiar to me. It can be really scary to feel both so fog brained and exhausted so I really hear how miserable this is for you. You don’t sound like a baby at all, you sound like a little trooper for getting through this.

          I avoid anything but very gentle exercise like slow restorative hatha yoga and walks. By the sea or in a forest is often calming and the air is good.
          I actually can’t imagine how extraordinarily tiring it must be to work in a salon and feel like you do. I’m sitting most of the day and I am still fatigued!

          If you get a full blood panel and lab print outs you can then familiarise yourself with what it means. There’s lots of good help online to support you in understanding what each entry means but common ones are FT4, FT3, Trab, TSH, TSI etc and you can then see where you’re at. You probably already know all this though.

          In Europe anti thyroid drugs like Carbimazole are used long term sometimes, depending on the person’s level of health and wellness as removing the thyroid will mean a lifetime of thyroid replacement drugs. It really depends on your own situation. Removal could be useful depending on the clinical picture.

          I would say that anything that soothes you will have a restorative affect on your nervous system, endocrine system and most vitally your immune system. I have found acupuncture with ATD’s to be a very good combination.

          But also, even though you are exhausted and very tired, do seek a second opinion from other doctors if you feel it would be beneficial and do request that other auto immune conditions be explored. Sometimes bringing a relative or friend with you to appointments can help underline the severe unwellness you are experiencing, can be good support and can remember things you might forget to bring up.

          Something like pernicious anemia which would require B12 shots can be simply tested for and when treated make a huge impact.

          For what it’s worth if you could possibly take some time off it might give you a chance to regroup. Not always possibly I know but has helped lots of Graves folks to heal. Do mind yourself and take good care. Please do let me know how you get on.

          Ms Lux X

          mollypop43
            Post count: 7

            Hey again guys!
            You have no idea how nice it is to just hear there are people out there that really understand how im feeling, when people ask why im so tired all the time I try to explain, but ultimately they always shrug me off lol. Im so used to it, I just dont even try to explain the reasoning anymore. Thank you guys so much for the suggestions, it means a lot! I just had to vent really quickly though; I went to a different (not an endo) doctor on tuesday morning, because I was in so much pain that I wanted to go in and see if he had any suggestions to tide me over until I got my thyroid levels straightened out. I told him all of my symptoms, I had even came in with them all written down so I wouldnt forget anything (which i always do haha)… I literally told him everything, and he did a couple random balance tests, and pressed around on soome of my muscles etc. and came to the conclusion that “He thinks I worry too much..and that he knows I want a magic pill to fix everything but that wont solve anything” I was so hurt after he said that :( It made me feel like I was totally overreacting, and made me want to get out of his office asap. I dont know what he even meant by the magic pill comment, I asked him before he had made that comment if there were any VITAMINS he could suggest, or certain topical creams i.e. Biofreeze or icy hot… I got the feeling that he thought i was seeking narcotics lol I was so taken back by that.

            Just having you guys understand my symptoms makes me feel so good, makes me feel like im not overreacting for once. Even my parents dont really understand my pain, because my brother has graves as well, and hes fine… so its definitely hard for anyone to understand. When I was going through my apprenticeship I would find any point in the day to take 5 minutes and sit down just to relieve my pain for a few minutes, but I had gotten in trouble for it, because in their eyes i am being lazy, which is totally understandable but soo frustrating.. not towards them, but frustrated with ME! I hate being perceived as the “lazy one”

            Anywhoooo, thank you guys sooo much for the support. Just being able to talk to fellow gravers is so comforting and to know other people have the same problems :) Thank you again, and as soon as i get into my endo I shall update you on what they tell me! :)))

            snelsen
              Post count: 1909

              Hi Molly, I’m next door to you, so to speak, in Washington!
              Cross the doc you saw today off your list, if he belongs on any list, it would be a completely different kind of list (if you get my drift!)

              From reading your post, i’m thinking that you and your endo have been trying all this time to get you to the right place with ATD’s (ie methimazole.) But it does seem that this is not working well for you. I am wondering a few things. ‘How often do you have thyroid labs? Do you keep copies of your labs? Maybe copies of what your endo dictated at your visits, so you can review them?’ I’m thinking you need an appointment (labs before the appointment) as soon as possible.
              I am asking, ’cause, I am wondering if your endo adjusts your methimazole at all based on your labs, or if you labs have been stable (I know YOU have been all over the place, just wondering what your labs are doing. Does he know your symptoms, and how you are doing??? The way you are living right now is not OK. It can be better. Have you considered that managing your Graves’ with ATD’s for the rest of your life may not be the answer for you? Sounds like has never been good for you, that you have never really gotten back to feeling like YOUl

              As Kimberly said, there are three treatments, and you know them. Have you ever considered surgery, having a thyroidectomy, as an option? If you read the forum, you will see that many of us have chosen that option, including myself. I was very happy with choosing surgery. And, you know that ATD’s and RAI are the other options. You don’t want RAI, and it seems that the way you are being managed now is not working well for you at all, that you feel crappy, and are really ill with Graves’. What does your endo say about all of this?

              I am wondering if you need a fresh set of eyes evaluating you, like another endo for a 2nd opinion. Have you considered this?

              For you, at this time, the LAST thing you need to do is to try to work out.
              You are really sick right now. I am so so sorry. Super tough to work full time at your demanding job, feeling the way you do.

              There are some good references for families of Graves’ patients, I am hoping Kimberly sends them your way. Your family, and even you, are comparing you to your brother, and the fact that he is doing well. But this is you, and you sure do need help to get you back to having a good life. It is definitely possible. Absolutely, you do NOT have to continue to live like this.

              Do write again soon.
              Shirley

              linzyyyy
                Post count: 21

                Hi! I just wanted to say hello and that I understand everything you have written about on here and experienced them myself. Although I was just diagnosed in November, I can look back and see that I’ve had Graves’ for about 6 years. I also felt like I was just being lazy and couldn’t understand why I was so tired all the time. I would push myself but it didn’t help. I also just felt STUPID. Forgetful, and just couldn’t process thoughts like I used to. I was so smart and sharp. I thought that I had just been out of school too long and had been watching too much TV or something…

                I’m a stay at home mom now but I used to be a hair stylist too! I used to work for the Rusk Design Team. I completely understand the grueling 10 hours of no sitting or eating. All of that PLUS Graves’ sounds awful.

                Anyway just wanted to say hi and let you know you’re not lazy or crazy or dumb. And I know you said you don’t want RAI but I did it, went hypo in 8 weeks, now I’m on Snythroid and feeling so much better! It’s been a journey, and I’m still not 100% “normal” yet (still figuring out the right synthroid dose, it’s only been like… 8 weeks) but oh my gosh, what a difference!!! My favorite part is that I can *think* again. And sleep. And exercise!

                Good luck and I hope you start feeling better soon!
                <3 Lindsay

                Kimberly
                Online Facilitator
                  Post count: 4291

                  @Shirley – Had to LOL at your “list” comment!

                  I think these are the references you were mentioning. Although the one piece was directed at husbands, it can definitely be helpful for *all* family members!

                  (Note on links: if you click directly on the following link, you will need to use your browser’s “back” button to return to the boards after viewing, or you will have to log back in to the forum. As an alternative, you can right-click the link and open it in a new tab or new window).

                  An Open Letter to Husbands of Graves’ Patients:
                  http://gdatf.org/about/about-graves-disease/patient-education/an-open-letter-to-husbands-of-graves-patients/

                  What’s Wrong With Me? I’m Not Myself Anymore:
                  http://gdatf.org/about/about-graves-disease/patient-education/whats-wrong-with-me/

                  @mollypop43 – We had a doctor at our 2011 Boston conference note that he had NEVER seen two cases of Graves’ that were exactly alike – even in identical twins! So it’s great that your brother had a fairly easy time, but please don’t let that invalidate your own experience.

                  mollypop43
                    Post count: 7

                    Hey there!
                    Basically i am wondering what the benefit to RAI, or having your thyroid surgically removed is. Because the way I look at it, is that you are automatically going to go HYPO, therefore still going to have to take pills for the rest of your life either way, and what if I am constantly battling the hypo side of it too? Ive looked up hypothyroidism, and there seem to be many of the same effects as graves.. and on top of it all battling weight gain/ being over weight would be an added concern rather then just being normal/on the thinner side. Know what I mean? Can anyone educate me on this any further. That would be awesome :D

                    Harpy
                      Post count: 184

                      There really is no benefit to RAI or Surgery,
                      All three treatment options carry ther own set of risk factors,

                      To evaluate what is best for you, you need to do plenty of research, searching all over, using all resources at your disposal so that you can make a fully informed decision.

                      From what I have seen over the years, there is more at work with GD than just the simple thyroid antibodies hypothesis and there are plenty of people that have had RAI or Surgery and still deal with lingering symptoms many years later, that by itself tells anyone that the thyroid itself is not the issue.

                      A statement I read recently stated simply:
                      “If your doc’s can’t get your dosage right now, with a thyroid, do you really think they will be any better at regulating your dose when when they have removed/ablated your thyroid’

                      I think you are right with the Hypo thing, there are 10 times as many Hypothyroid individuals VS GD patients, this should be a big enough pool for the medical profession to perfect their practices, yet Hypo discussion groups are everywhere, because people just don’t feel well and hence feel the need to look elswhere.

                      Another thing to consider as well is just the simple fact, may be a rare event and not be pertinent to everyone but it is a fact, without a functioning thyroid you rely on an external dose for support, if you go travelling, trecking, get marooned, lost etc and don’t have med’s, then it’s gonna end pretty bad, think it’s 6 weeks before your body runs out of what’s in the system.

                      snelsen
                        Post count: 1909

                        To Molly-
                        I think understand what you mean by benefit of RAI and surgery. I think what you mean is, what are the pros and cons of the two options? I think reading the experiences of the decision tree of people on this site, plus following some of the good suggestions by others, including my last post, will be most helpful to you.

                        Now, to pretty much say that I’d like to mildly respond and disagree with most of Harpy’s comments. My problem is that your posts infer “facts” rather that what you have decided to think. I’m in a feisty mood today. With the post you have just written, your disclaimer at the bottom of your post (which long ago, my comments prompted you to write in the first place) is well worth for any reader to review.

                        To Harpy
                        1. Not sure what you mean by” there is no benefit to RAI or surgery.”
                        THey are two of the three treatments for Graves, the other one being ATD’s.
                        RAI and surgery put us in a place so that we can be safe from the hell of being hyperthyroid, and possibly dying if untreated,with all the risks that accompany it.

                        2. Your second paragraph presents itself as factual, which it is not, and is not helpful. I don’t even know what you mean by your statement regarding antibodies being a simple hypothesis. Not sure “what you have seen over the years,” but your whole post this time not backed by any evidence-based research at all.

                        3. THe statement that you read beginning, “If your doc’s…” That is patently wrong to include on this forum. I am surprised it was not deleted by the facilitators. It is a huge disservice to say that. There is no logic at all with the statement. It addresses two different phases of treatment for Graves; of course the treatment WITH a thyroid, is exactly what you have been doing with your partner for the past 3-4 years, with the ATD, and it has taken you this period of time to “get it right.”
                        It does not belong on this forum. It is as valid as me saying that the sky is blue, cause I read it somewhere.
                        It is challenging to get the right dose of either ATD or thyroid hormone, and it does take some time and tweaking of dose to get to the “sweet spot” as it is frequently referred to in the forum. Hard to replicate our wonderful bodies, when our wonderful bodies run amuk.

                        4. Hypo paragraph. The inference that medical profession should have been able to perfect their practice because of the numbers of people who are hypo, seems pretty subjective to me. I guess you can say the same thing about diabetes, which is epidemic in this nation, plus cancer and cardiac treatments. Nice idea, and I am sure the medical profession would like to perfect their practice in all these areas.
                        Re hypo- It has been my experience, that, as we age, along with many other body performances and functions, some people become hypothyroid, with the symptoms that accompany it. Much more common in women than men. Although I don’t have the literature in front of me, I think that there is a defined age bracket in women when this might happen. That is because, by the labs and symptoms, the body is not producing enough thyroid hormone for an individual. Then, a thyroid hormone is prescribed, and when the optimal amount is reached, people do feel better. But it does have to be tweaked and monitored, because our bodies and constantly aging and changing. It is discouraging to feel hypo, and I am sure that there are discussion groups about this. There are always other factors to contribute to not feeling well.

                        Your last paragraph also relates to insulin, cardiac meds, and ATD’s, to mention a few. Obviously, traveling, trekking are easily resolved by having more medications that you need for a defined period of time. If there is a national disaster, and all transportation and functioning comes to a halt, all people who are dependent on a medication for good health or a safe life, are in trouble. Insulin dependence being one of the biggies. But I don’t think it is fair to present it as a con to deciding between RAI or surgery for Graves’. It is also a big con to go untreated, and an equal con to be dependent on ATD’s.
                        Shirley

                        LaurelM
                          Post count: 216

                          Hi MollyP,

                          I have to disagree somewhat with Harpy. If your thyroid is producing an inconsistant amount of thyroid hormone, it can be more difficult to manage on and ATD than removing the thyroid and providing replacement at the right consistant dose. Granted, it may take some amount of time to determine the correct dose of replacement and it may require some tweaks over time.

                          Also, if you are unable to acheive remission on ATD, then you will have to stay on it long term (like Kimberly the facilitator). So, you are still required to take a daily medication. Harpy’s statement about traveling and not being able to get your medication seems strange to me. Replacement thyroid is a much more common medication than the ATDs. In fact, my pharmacy has trouble stocking my PTU. They consistently have to only partially fill my prescription or combine multiple manufacturers and I live in a major metropolitan area. And, there is more risk of serious side effects from an ATD than from replacment hormone (filler/dye reactions).

                          I think another assumption that was made is that because there are a number of other thyroid board where people are not feeling their best is that a high percentage of patients do not do well on replacement. Of the 4 people that I know (2 with RAI treated GD, one with Hashi, and one treated for thyroid cancer with RAI & TT) none of them have had any issues with getting their replacement regulated and never visit online forums.

                          I always take comfort especially from my friend who had thyroid cancer in her mid-20s. She had RAI at a much, much higher dose than GD patients receive after her TT. She was required to stay in a special radiation room at the hospital for several days. (GD patients get to go home the same day.) They had to make absolutely sure that there was zero thyroid tissue left in her body. She is now almost 40. She has never had any weight issues and has a darling and healthy 5 year old.

                          There are risks with RAI and TT. RAI can worsen eye involement (steroid may help with this risk) and it occasionally has to be repeated. It also takes longer as the tyroid tissue dies off to regulate a replacement dose. TT has the usual sugical risks but having an experience surgeon helps mitigate the risks.

                          I was originally treated with Methimazole about 7 years ago and experienced a 6 year remission. I came out of remission and have been on PTU for about a year.

                          Take your time to consider all your options.

                          Take care,

                          Laurel

                          Kimberly
                          Online Facilitator
                            Post count: 4291

                            @mollypop43 – I would also disagree with Harpy’s “no benefit” comment, and would encourage you to read the thoughtful replies from Shirley and Laurel.

                            The “Treatment Options” thread in the announcement section of the forum has two great links that go over the pros and cons of *all* three options. The second link (the one from the American Thyroid Assoc. & American Assoc. of Clinical Endocrinologists) goes through some of the values that might make patients prefer one treatment option over another.

                            There are members of this forum who have been very happy with their treatment choice, regardless of whether that choice was ATDs, RAI, or Surgery. We have also had members who had bad experiences with each of these treatment options.

                            I have been on ATDs for 5 1/2 years, and I am still mostly happy with that choice. (My antibodies are still raging, so stopping the meds is not an option). I am not ready to roll the dice and see if I might end up feeling *better* or *worse* with one of the other treatment options. However, the biggest down side for me has been frequent endo visits to adjust dosing, particularly during periods of stress. When things are fluctuating, I need labs and office visits about every two months, all of which comes out of pocket, as my insurance company won’t cover anything Graves’-related.

                            The bottom line is that it’s important to consult with your doctor, research from credible sources, and make the decision that is right for *you*.

                            Gabe
                              Post count: 182

                              Hi MollyP, while Harpy has a right to his/her opinions they are biased and factually mis-leading. Keep reading the experiences of others and you will find your way.

                              Harpy, it’s been interesting as a new person on this forum to read posts of people such as yourself who seem to have an agenda. While you have a right to be on this forum, you are NOT a patient and have no idea what it is like to LIVE with the disease and the decisions…regardless of the direct experiences with your long term partner.

                              I value all opinions and suggestions and experiences on this forum…from actual patients.

                              Karen

                              Harpy
                                Post count: 184

                                Everyone has an Agenda, whether they care to admit it or not.

                                The medical system has an Agenda and two of the primary drivers of that are patient care and cost, which unfortunately most of the time are pulling in opposite directions.

                                I’m sure that most doctors would like to give the best care possible to their patients, but the constraints of the system mean they need to make compromises, this is evident in public debate regarding budgetary measures and within the doctors office with the short duration of consultations.

                                So with these constraints, it then falls back to the patient to do adequate research if they want the best health outcome possible, so that they can make informed decisions.

                                Each treatment for thyroid conditions comes with it’s own set of risks, and different options will suit different individuals. From what I read here and elswhere the medical system in general does not have a good handle when it comes to applying any of the three treatment protocols although they all do have their place when applied properly, in my opinion most doctors are behind on current research, primarily because they are time poor, I don’t think they are bad people, but this means that they may not be in the best position to give the most up to date advice.

                                There are global discrepancies on the way treatment protocols are applied, but there is only one set of scientific data and with this day and age of information at your fingertips, one would imagine that there should be a treatment consensus based on the science available, hence the only way I can explain these discrepancies is that different Agenda’s are driving the preferential approaches in different countries.

                                If there was global medical consensus based on the current level on scientific information we would not be having this discussion.

                                Kimberly
                                Online Facilitator
                                  Post count: 4291

                                  I don’t expect we will ever see this consensus, unless researchers discover a fourth option that has a VERY favorable side effect profile. Patients will react differently to each of the three existing treatment options. I’ve been on this forum since 2008, and I’ve seen many success stories – but also a smaller number of patients with complications. (*Not* that these will happen to any given person, but they are all issues to be aware of.) Patients who had liver issues, WBC issues, or severe allergic reactions to Anti-thyroid drugs. Patients who had a hard time getting levels stabilized after RAI or surgery. Patients who had eye complications following RAI, and wonder if this was a factor. Patients who have struggled with hypoparathyroidism following thyroid surgery. Plus, there are a whole host of other factors to consider. Is the patient a child or adult? Is the patient pregnant — or hoping to become pregnant in the near future? Are there any other co-existing medical conditions?

                                  If a patient has been a success story with one of the treatment options, it’s tempting to tell other patients that that’s the option that *they* should choose, too. But there’s just no way to predict the outcome with any given person and any given treatment option. That’s why we tell people to research from credible sources, consult with their medical team – and then make the the decision that seems right to them.

                                  @mollypop43 – Sorry we’ve kinda hijacked your thread, but hopefully this has given you some good “food for thought”!

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